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Carmine the Wizard

Naples is a city strewn with street vendors. Bread, thin pizzas meant to be eaten folded, fried pizzas, octopus broth, roasted artichokes, cones full of fried goodies, donuts, panzerotti and rice balls – there’s little you can’t find one of Naples’ vendors selling (in our opinion, only Palermo in Sicily eclipses Naples on this front).

Indo-Caribbean Queens

Where the A train dead-ends at Lefferts Boulevard, Liberty Avenue stretches on into the heart of the enclave known as Little Guyana, part of the larger Richmond Hill neighborhood. Once a year, for the Hindu holiday of Diwali, a bedazzled motorcade turns the street into an eruption of colors, music and lights that is a taste of home for many of the neighborhood’s Indo-Caribbeans.

Kitchen Rebuild

While home cooks preparing food for their families are revered and restaurants occupy an important place in the social fabric, food businesses run out of individual homes often carry negative connotations in Middle Eastern societies. Many would assume that the person making these meals is jobless, uneducated, in dire need of money, or some combination of the three.

A New LIFE

In happier times in Aleppo, a sweet drink called sharab al-louz – made with almond extract, milk and sugar – was a staple at celebratory events such as engagement parties and weddings, Ammar Rida recalls. That was before he had to leave his job as a lecturer at the University of Aleppo and flee Syria lest he be conscripted to fight in the war that has been ravaging his country for the past seven years.

Northward Bound

Enslaved Africans first stepped onto North American soil in 1619, unloaded by the Dutch West Indian Company in Jamestown, Virginia. Colonists first auctioned enslaved Africans in New Amsterdam (now New York City), New York, in 1626.

While writing about where to find a good, honest lunch is a worthy endeavor in itself, CB is also committed to covering stories and subjects that deserve a deeper and longer look. Done in partnership with talented independent reporters, researchers and artists, our Special Projects use food and culinary culture as a lens through which to explore and explain critical issues and to document endangered traditions.

May 6, 2019

Indo-Caribbean Queens: A Curious Eater’s Guide to “Little Guyana”

By Ike Allen
Queens Migrant Kitchens -- Where the A train dead-ends at Lefferts Boulevard, Liberty Avenue stretches on into the heart of the enclave known as Little Guyana, part of the larger Richmond Hill neighborhood. Once a year, for the Hindu holiday of Diwali, a bedazzled motorcade turns the street into an eruption of colors, music and lights that is a taste of home for many of the neighborhood’s Indo-Caribbeans.
Explore all stories in Queens Migrant Kitchens project
March 26, 2019

Kitchen Rebuild: Yusuf and Samar’s Syrian Home Cooking

By Dima Al Sayed and Noama Fawakhirjy
The Syrian Kitchen in Exile -- While home cooks preparing food for their families are revered and restaurants occupy an important place in the social fabric, food businesses run out of individual homes often carry negative connotations in Middle Eastern societies. Many would assume that the person making these meals is jobless, uneducated, in dire need of money, or some combination of the three.
Explore all stories in The Syrian Kitchen in Exile project