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A New LIFE

In happier times in Aleppo, a sweet drink called sharab al-louz – made with almond extract, milk and sugar – was a staple at celebratory events such as engagement parties and weddings, Ammar Rida recalls. That was before he had to leave his job as a lecturer at the University of Aleppo and flee Syria lest he be conscripted to fight in the war that has been ravaging his country for the past seven years.

Northward Bound

Enslaved Africans first stepped onto North American soil in 1619, unloaded by the Dutch West Indian Company in Jamestown, Virginia. Colonists first auctioned enslaved Africans in New Amsterdam (now New York City), New York, in 1626.

syrian food istanbul

Bouz Al-Jidi

On a side street in Istanbul’s Fatih district, a neighborhood now brimming with Syrians, a small restaurant makes many passers-by do a double take – the 1960s-style façade looks like something straight out of Damascus.

newcomer kitchen toronto

Newcomer Kitchen

Every kitchen lives by its ebb and flow. There’s the gentle simmer of rote prep and small talk; the mad tango of searing sautés and the electric energy on the assembly line. Stray bits of sumac and fennel. Shouting matches and saucy spoons.

How the World Came to Queens

The story of how Queens transformed into a microcosm of the world’s cuisines is just as fascinating and important as those of the cuisines’ creators. The borough is one of the most diverse places on the planet, with over 120 countries represented and 135 languages officially spoken in the public school system. The cause? The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965.

While writing about where to find a good, honest lunch is a worthy endeavor in itself, CB is also committed to covering stories and subjects that deserve a deeper and longer look. Done in partnership with talented independent reporters, researchers and artists, our Special Projects use food and culinary culture as a lens through which to explore and explain critical issues and to document endangered traditions.

December 5, 2018

A New LIFE: Helping Refugees Become Food Entrepreneurs

By
The Syrian Kitchen in Exile -- In happier times in Aleppo, a sweet drink called sharab al-louz – made with almond extract, milk and sugar – was a staple at celebratory events such as engagement parties and weddings, Ammar Rida recalls. That was before he had to leave his job as a lecturer at the University of Aleppo and flee Syria lest he be conscripted to fight in the war that has been ravaging his country for the past seven years.
Explore all stories in The Syrian Kitchen in Exile project