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Vezir Han

Khan al-Wazir is a remnant of Aleppo’s Ottoman past: In the late 17th century, the Ottoman governor of Aleppo commissioned the construction of this large caravanserai (in fact, its name means “caravanserai of the minister”), a building that housed both merchants and travelers.

Rejon Kilis Kebab

We are sure that many parallel universes exist within the labyrinthine Grand Bazaar of Istanbul, one of the world’s biggest and oldest covered markets.

Haritna

On the walls at Haritna Restaurant are homages to simple sights: a large gate, ancient Damascene windows – it’s a scene that hopes to inspire the very particular feeling of sitting in the middle of a Damascus square, down a well-trodden, old lane. For in Arabic, haritna means “our lane.”

Fatma’s Sweets

Like most Syrians who fled their war-ravaged country and made their way to Turkey, Fatma Jabal, a 19-year-old from Aleppo now living in Istanbul, had to get creative in order to make a living. With a baby boy to take care of and her husband struggling to provide for their family while working as a carpenter, Fatma tapped into something she’s been doing since she was a child: baking cakes and cookies.

Carmine the Wizard

Naples is a city strewn with street vendors. Bread, thin pizzas meant to be eaten folded, fried pizzas, octopus broth, roasted artichokes, cones full of fried goodies, donuts, panzerotti and rice balls – there’s little you can’t find one of Naples’ vendors selling (in our opinion, only Palermo in Sicily eclipses Naples on this front).

While writing about where to find a good, honest lunch is a worthy endeavor in itself, CB is also committed to covering stories and subjects that deserve a deeper and longer look. Done in partnership with talented independent reporters, researchers and artists, our Special Projects use food and culinary culture as a lens through which to explore and explain critical issues and to document endangered traditions.

May 6, 2019

Indo-Caribbean Queens: A Curious Eater’s Guide to “Little Guyana”

By Ike Allen
Queens Migrant Kitchens -- Where the A train dead-ends at Lefferts Boulevard, Liberty Avenue stretches on into the heart of the enclave known as Little Guyana, part of the larger Richmond Hill neighborhood. Once a year, for the Hindu holiday of Diwali, a bedazzled motorcade turns the street into an eruption of colors, music and lights that is a taste of home for many of the neighborhood’s Indo-Caribbeans.
Explore all stories in Queens Migrant Kitchens project