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Sarah Khan

Sarah Khan

Sarah, is a Pakistani-American who talks fast. A focused wanderer, she recently returned from a Fulbright year in India. In between walking all over the 56 Queens neighborhoods, she is completing the Indian Women Farmers Documentary Film series. She studied nutrition, public health and plant sciences (ms, mph, phd). Her writing, short films and photography have appeared in The Art of Eating, Modern Farmer, Roads and Kingdoms and Zester Daily. Now she just wants to create media content with the superhero Amrita Simla graphics, animation, maps and the occasional song. She's waiting for the time when you can download and stream smells.

Recent stories by Sarah Khan

July 11, 2018

How the World Came to Queens

By
Queens -- The story of how Queens transformed into a microcosm of the world’s cuisines is just as fascinating and important as those of the cuisines’ creators. The borough is one of the most diverse places on the planet, with over 120 countries represented and 135 languages officially spoken in the public school system. The cause? The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. Read more
January 30, 2017

Queens’ Tamale Ladies

By
Queens -- Tamales sold streetside by migrant women from Mexico and Ecuador are among our favorite treats in Queens. The countless kinds of ethnic cuisine found in the borough and the people that lovingly cook it are what make it great.
January 30, 2017

Street Carts of Desire: The Tamale Ladies of Roosevelt Avenue

By
Queens -- (Editor's Note: In honor of the immigrants and refugees who have made their new home a better place for us all, this week we are running some of our favorite archived stories about those who have left a culinary mark on their adopted land.) If you walk the length of Roosevelt Avenue from 69th Street to 111th Street in the early morning, you may encounter up to two dozen tamale ladies, usually at the major intersections that correspond to the 7 train’s stops. Read more