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Kyle Long

Kyle Long

Kyle, one half of CBs Shanghai team, is an Oregon native with a hunger for finding the citys best noodles, dumplings and just about any type of dessert. Hes been sharing his love of authentic food and drink with his writing since moving to China in 2007. After co-founding Shanghais top culinary tour company in 2010, he took a sabbatical to cycle the world (well, 15 countries) and clocked in 18,000km while raising funds for clean water charities. When hes not running or cycling to make room for more Chinese food, you can find him scouring the web for cheap flights for his next trip.

Recent stories by Kyle Long

September 2, 2019

Yang Yang’s Dumplings: The Other Yang

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Shanghai -- Search online for Shanghai’s best fried dumplings, and you’ll come up with hundreds of results extolling Yang’s Fried Dumplings. Though it was once just a humble shop sandwiched between the Bund and People’s Square, the online renown and ensuing crowds have propelled the brand into chain-store ubiquity, populating new malls and shopping streets with fervor. Read more
Taste Chinese breakfast dishes on our Street Eats Breakfast walk in Shanghai!
August 13, 2019

Jianbing: Loved Abroad, Threatened at Home

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Shanghai -- When we set out to create a foodie “holiday” this past April for jianbing, one of China’s most-loved street snacks, we didn’t know quite what to expect. Our aim with World Jianbing Day, which included giveaways and a social media campaign encouraging people to add their favorite jianbing spots in China and abroad to a crowd-sourced map, was to build awareness outside the typical jianbing consumer base. Read more
Learn how to make your own intricate steamed dumplings on our tour!
March 6, 2019

Take a Bao: Shanghai’s Top 5 Soup Dumpling Restaurants

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Shanghai -- Xiaolongbao first appeared around 1875, during the Ming Dynasty, in Nanxiang, a village on the northwestern outskirts of Shanghai. As the story goes, a vendor selling dry steamed buns decided to innovate due to stiff competition. Legend also suggests, however, that he copied the giant soupier dumplings from Nanjing. Read more