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Once the hub of a trading empire that connected Macau in the east to Rio de Janeiro in the west, Lisbon today can at times feel like a sleepy town of nostalgic storefronts and scenic churches. But that’s only its façade. Take a closer look and you’ll discover a city that still maintains deep-rooted links around the world – just consider the local obsession with African piri piri sauce.

But there’s an even stronger tie to Portugal’s past in Lisbon, one that can be found in the form of the city’s communities from the former colonies. Though integral elements of Lisbon life, these communities can sometimes be an invisible presence in their adopted land, pushed out to the periphery of the city.

With our “Postcolonial Lisbon” series, CB hopes to bring these communities back into the center, looking at their cuisine, history and cultural life. In this first installment of the series, we look at Lisbon’s Cape Verdean community.

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May 11, 2017

Post-Colonial Lisbon: Angolan Edition

By Francesca Savoldi and Syma Tariq
Lisbon -- (Editor's Note: Lisbon's communities from Portugal's former colonies provide the strongest link to the country's past, when it was the hub of a trading empire that connected Macau in the east to Rio de Janeiro in the west. Though integral elements of Lisbon life, these communities can sometimes be an invisible presence in their adopted land, pushed out…
May 11, 2017

Angola in Lisbon: Taste

By Francesca Savoldi and Syma Tariq
Lisbon -- Those normally finding themselves craving Angolan flavors in central Lisbon head straight to Mouraria, the historic downtown neighborhood that has experienced a conceptual conversion of its peripheral status into a landmark of cultural and culinary diversity. Despite it being the area with the highest density of Angolans in Lisbon’s city center, Angolan restaurants open…
May 11, 2017

Angola in Lisbon: Go Deep

By Francesca Savoldi and Syma Tariq
Lisbon -- A three-floor cultural association in Rato, the neighborhood just north of sleek Principe Real, Casa de Angola has for decades focused primarily on bridging Angolan and Portuguese cultures. Created in 1971 by Angolan students, it launched without state support and is still subject to some intrigue. “Some say that this was an Angolan masonry…