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Book now       Give as a gift  US$125/adult

  • 2-7 people Beşiktaş -> ~6.5 hours 9:30am
    Kuzguncuk    No Sundays

Quick bite: From a workingman’s breakfast in the frenetic market to a leisurely fish lunch in the Bosphorus neighborhood, this full-day tour brings together the high points of life in Istanbul, in all their rich contrast.

The Bosphorus Strait, which divides the city of Istanbul and separates the European and Asian continents, has never failed to inspire; from Emperor Constantine to Mark Twain, its charms are well noted.

On the Bosphorus’ shores are palaces but also neighborhoods – from bustling marketplaces to multicultural fishing villages – all connected by the Bosphorus yet each a world unto itself. This is something that, despite Istanbul’s explosive growth, lives on today.

There must be something in the water here. Our exploration of this fascinating part of Istanbul starts in the market of Beşiktaş. A hub of ferry traffic, covered with the flags of its famous soccer team and with its narrow streets filled with rollicking meyhanes and simple restaurants serving breakfast all day long, this neighborhood is a slice of real, contemporary Istanbul like no other. Among the beer bars and cheap clothing stores are a few traditional culinary mainstays for menemen, Turkish style scrambled eggs, and bal kaymak, clotted cream blanketed in honey – that’s the way we like to start a day. We’ll visit an Ottoman-era bakery to get some freshly baked goods for the boat ride across the Bosphorus to the market at Üsküdar, where a more traditional food culture is preserved. We’ll sample the best of this market with visits to a honey vendor from Eastern Turkey, an olive shop and a third-generation candymaker, before setting off for the fairytale neighborhood of Kuzguncuk.

Here we will explore the multicultural history of the area, tasting the nostalgia for that bygone era when Jews, Christians and Muslims shared these leafy streets, and the spirit of the Kuzguncuk of today by visiting its small restaurants, artisanal food shops and local food makers.

Fee includes everything consumed on the walk.  Some special features:

Includes a ferry ride across the Bosphorus Explores residential neighborhoods.
Includes a market visit Sometimes includes a home-visit.
Samples fish.  Most stops can be altered for pesceterians No pork served on the walk
Some hills and stairs, & sitting, it can be strenuous at times. Children welcome

What is included in the fee?

In addition to your Culinary Backstreets guide, all food consumed on the walk – almost a dozen different edible specialties – are included in the price.

Why is the Culinary Backstreet tour more expensive than some other walking tours?

Our approach is different than most tour companies. Each of our culinary walks is the outcome of considerable research. We work with academics in the field and our own team of experienced professionals – both guides and local journalists. Our ongoing publishing of articles, from restaurant reviews to features about the intersection of food and culture, constantly feeds new material into the culinary walks, so they evolve and constantly improve. Though costly, we believe that this is how to create the quality experiences we strive for.

We practice honest tourism  and would never accept a free lunch or any sort of commission. On the contrary, we are proud to know that the money spent during the culinary walk goes to support businesses that we believe in, helping to preserve the social and cultural fabric of the cities we love so dearly.

What is the payment process?

We require a $50 per person deposit to complete the online booking.  Then, we accept the remaining $75 per person in cash (USD, Euro, or Turkish lira) on the day of the walk.  If at any time you want to pay for your balance electronically, please just click ‘view booking’ on your confirmation email and there is an option to ‘pay balance’.

What is your cancellation policy?

100% will be refunded if given 1 week notice prior to walk and 50% will be refunded if given 72 hours notice or more.

Are your walks public or private? How many people are on them?

Our walks are 2-7 people and are open to the public. If you would like to do a private walk, we may be able to arrange one for an additional fee. Please contact us at walks@culinarybackstreets.com for more information.

Can I get a discount if I join more than one walk?

Yes, we offer a 10% discount to those who join more than one walk. Please email us at walks@culinarybackstreets.com if you’d like to join multiple walks.

Are your walks suitable for people with food allergies?

This can vary based on a number of factors, including the food item in question. Please email us at walks@culinarybackstreets.com to discuss your situation before booking.

Is alcohol served on the walks?

We sometimes taste some local Turkish wine on this walk.

Is the food offered on the walks halal?

This is difficult to answer. In Turkey the halal certification process is relatively new, so though many butchers are halal they may not be certified and though many restaurants use halal products they may not advertise or even recognize it. Because of this, we cannot confidently say that all of the food is halal.

Can children join the walks?

Of course! But please note that Istanbul’s streets – narrow, uneven and often lacking a sidewalk – can be challenging with a stroller.

We offer a 50% discount to children 12 years old and younger. We do not charge for children 6 and under.

Do you offer walks during Ramazan?

We do offer this walk during Ramazan and some local holidays.

Can you pick me up from my hotel? How will I return, once the tour is over?

Our tour prices don’t include transportation. If you book a tour, you’re responsible for arriving to the pre-arranged meeting spot on your own.

Once the tour is over, we will help you get an authorized, safe taxi to your hotel, or provide directions on public transportation, if you’re interested in that.

How much food will I get to try?

This is really up to you. We generally make between 9 and 12 eating stops on our walk and try to include some breaks from eating along the way. The price includes as much food as you’re open to trying. We offer a suggested portion size at each stop and you can take our recommendation if you’d like. Our walks often involve street food and sharing food.

Still have questions? Please email us at walks@culinarybackstreets.com.

MAPA ISTAMBUL-07

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