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January 10, 2017

Seychelles: Post-Industrial Cooking

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Athens -- The neighborhood of Metaxourgeio in central Athens gets its name from the historic Athanasios Douroutis silk factory (metaxi means “silk”), which closed down in 1875. Read more
Athens -- The neighborhood of Metaxourgio in central Athens gets its name from the historic Athanasios Douroutis silk factory (metaxi means “silk”), which closed down in 1875. The former factory, which now houses the Municipal Art Gallery, was designed in 1833 by the Danish architect Hans Christian Hansen and is among the city's most important surviving neoclassical structures.

The building was originally intended to be a shopping center, but because the area became an industrial zone, it inevitably attracted mostly working-class residents who were employed in the nearby factories, smaller industries or workshops. Read more
January 9, 2017

Maspindzelo: Hangover Helper

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Tbilisi -- We spent our first few years in Georgia in a whirlwind of overindulgence, hostages to the unforgiving hospitality of friends and acquaintances. Try as they might to convince us that their wine and chacha were so “clean” we would not get hangovers, there were plenty of mornings when the insides of our skulls felt like 60-grain sandpaper and our tongues like welcome mats for packs of wet street mongrels. We would hobble out of bed and stumble to the fridge and, if lucky, find two of Georgia’s most recognized hangover remedies: Borjomi mineral water and matzoni, Georgian yogurt. While Borjomi has the reputation of healing everything from gastric ulcers to impotency and colds and matzoni does soothe the grit away, everyone who has been there knows the only real cure for hangover is tripe soup. Read more
Walk in the footsteps of the varinas, on our Song of the Sea tour.
January 6, 2017

Varinas: Lisbon's Vanished Roving Fishmongers

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Lisbon -- Varinas may no longer be prowling the streets of Lisbon, yet they remain iconic characters of the city. Until the 1980s, one would regularly hear these women loudly advertising the fresh fish they sold out of baskets they carried on their heads as they walked the hilly streets around the Lisbon. Read more