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November 14, 2017

Mariscos El Paisa: Market Gourmet

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Mexico City -- Mexico City’s Mercado Jamaica, a jumble of produce vendors and flower sellers, is not a place you would expect to find a gourmet establishment in. But this is what makes this public market so appealing: Hidden away among the various vendors in this massive market are several outstanding food spots, ranging in size and scope from a nondescript green chorizo taquería to a fine-dining seafood spot.Read more
Mexico City -- Mexico City’s Mercado Jamaica, a jumble of produce vendors and flower sellers, is not a place you would expect to find a gourmet establishment in. But this is what makes this public market so appealing: Hidden away among the various vendors in this massive market are several outstanding food spots, ranging in size and scope from a nondescript green chorizo taquería to a fine-dining seafood spot.

Mariscos El Paisa didn’t start out as a “gourmet” restaurant when it first opened back in 1958 – like many other market establishments, it was humble and unpretentious. But in recent years, the kitchen has upped its game, putting out elevated seafood dishes (although the restaurant still retains an unpretentious vibe).
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October 26, 2017

Día de los Muertos: Grateful for the Dead

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Mexico City -- Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), or at least some variation of it, has been an annual celebration in Mexico for over 3,000 years. During the Aztec period, it took the form of a festival in August dedicated to Mictecacihuatl, otherwise known as the Lady of the Dead, who was the ruler of the underworld and the afterlife with her husband, Mictlantecuhtli. Read more
October 24, 2017

Preparations for Day of the Dead in Mexico City

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BACKSTREET FEED -- Calabaza en tacha (pumpkin boiled with raw sugar) is a common sight in the days leading up to Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in Mexico City. The candied pumpkin features prominently on the altars built by families to entice the spirits of the dead to visit once again. Feed more